NEW ARRIVALS
Ancient Eastern Art
Armoires
Commodes
Trunks
Consoles
Desks
Tables
Armchairs
Dining chairs
Settees
Benches & Stools
Beds
Chandeliers, Lanterns & Appliques
Lamps
Mirrors
Objects & Curiosities
Paintings
Porcelain, Potteries & Vases
Sculptures & Statues
Carpets, Tapestries & Suzani Embroideries
Historic Building Materials
Cambodia
Garden
Warehouse sales
SOLD
SOLD
7292**

Dogs cast iron

Size 87 wide x 50 deep x 76 high



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Ref. 7128

Bronze greyhound

Signed P.A, Mène



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
bronze sculture Rhinoceros 19th C
bronze sculture Rhinoceros 19th C

0697**

Bronze Rhinoceros

15 cm high x 16 cm wide x 7 cm deep



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
**

Bronze statue

20,5 cm high x 16 cm x 8 cm



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
SOLD
9280**

Bronze sculpture 'Pointer and bird' by Jules Moigniez

20 cm high x 31 cm wide

The Pointer is caught mid stride and looks down at the bird trying to hide under the plant. Moigniez was a master at depicting hunting dogs and this model shows his ability. The details in this small bronze are sharp and clear, it is just as well cast as the larger ones.

Jules Moigniez (1835 - 1894) was born in Senlis, France.  He was a student of Paul Comolera and his attraction to bird sculpture comes from his studies with his teacher.  His most plentiful subjects were game birds but he sculpted dogs, horses and a few equestrian groups.  Moigniez's first recorded exhibit was at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1855, at the age of twenty, where he exhibited a plaster titled Pointer stopping at a Pheasant.  He exhibited regularly at the annual Salons from 1859 until 1892 showing a total of thirty works.  He also exhibited in England at the London International Exhibition of 1862 where he found a very receptive audience in the people of England.  Moigniez was a very successful sculptor in France as well as England and America. 

Most of Moigniez's bronzes were cast by his father, who was a metal glider by training.  Their foundry was established in 1857 solely for the propose of producing Moigniez's bronzes. The detail in these casts by father and son is exceptional.  Many of Moigniez's bronzes were gilded, silver-plated or had very different and unusual patinas applied to them as the Moigniezs' were constantly experimenting with new finishes for their market. Jules Moigniez became ill in 1869 and never recovered. He produced no new models from that date on and in 1894 he took his own life.  Moigniez's father kept casting his son's works after his tragic death and upon his fathers death the foundry as well as all of the plasters and models were sold to Aususte Gouge. 



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
9077**

Grand tour bronze figuring 'Lorenzo de' Medici' after Michelangelo

(part of the Marble tomb monument for Lorenzo de' Medici, New Sacristy, San Lorenzo, Firenze)

72 cm high

Beginning in the late sixteenth century, it became fashionable for young aristocrats to visit Paris, Venice, Florence, and above all Rome, as the culmination of their classical education. Thus was born the idea of the Grand Tour, a practice which introduced Englishmen, Germans, Scandinavians, and also Americans to the art and culture of France and Italy for the next 300 years. Travel was arduous and costly throughout the period, possible only for a privileged class—the same that produced gentleman scientists, authors, antiquaries, and patrons of the arts. Many artists benefited from the patronage of Grand Tourists eager to procure mementos of their travels



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
1289**

Objet de Grand Tours, Column of Trajan

Bronze

30 cm high



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Ref. 1162

Bronze sculpture: 'Rape of the Sabine Women', originally by Giambologna.

Giambologna wanted to create a composition with the figura serpentina, an upward snakelike spiral movement to be examined from all sides. This is the first group representing more than a single figure in European sculptural history to be conceived without a dominant viewpoint. It can be equally admired from all sides. 

38 cm high



Click here to request more information about this item.

Ref. 8747

Bronze sculpture by G. Ferrari

34 cm high x 40 cm wide x 12 cm deep



Click here to request more information about this item.


A set of six ebonised and carved walnut game trophy reliefs, 19th century

Each with a ribbon tie and moulded backplate depicting a boar and a hare(land) two quails and a pheasant(sky), some fishes and a lobster(sea)

55 cm high x 30 cm wide



Click here to request more information about this item.

(Rechts **)

On the left: A French bronze figure of Mercuy

After Giambologna, 19th century.  Mounted on a Bleu turquin circular marble base

26 cm high

On the right: An Italian bronze figure of Mercury

33 cm high



Click here to request more information about this item.


A pair of relief carved oak armorial cartouches

North German, 17th century

42 cm high



Click here to request more information about this item.


'Four seasons', carara marble, Italy, 19th century

80 cm high



Click here to request more information about this item.

9160**

Bronze statue of  Mercury on marble base

28 cm high

 



Click here to request more information about this item.

ref. 9080

Bronze sculpture of a goat by Léon Mignon

25 cm high x 30 cm wide

Léon Mignon (Liège - Schaarbeek 1898) was a Belgian sculptor working in realist idiom. Mignon completed his studies at the Académie des Beaux-Arts de Liège in 1871. He made his first showing at the Salon of Gent, and obtained a fellowship from the Fondation Darchis for further study in Italy.  He set up his studio in Paris in 1876 in collaboration with Paul de Vigne, then settled permanently at Schaarbeek. He won a gold medal at the Paris Salon for his sculpture Li Tore, the Bull-Tamer which provoked polemics from critics for its combination of nudity with forthright realism. Li Tore, set up at Liège, became the mascot of the students, who hid it in the cellars of the Académie royale des Beaux-Arts de Liège to ptotect it during Word War II. The bull has become an emblem for all Liège, with the city motto "Liège, forcer l’avenir!", "Liège, make the future happen!"   One among his animalier sculptures is to be seen at the Botanical Garden of Brussels: The Olive Tree, or Peace, representing an agricultural worker with his ox. His early Combat de taureaux dans la campagne romaine is conserved in the Musée Royal des Beaux-Arts, Brussels.



Click here to request more information about this item.

ref. 7629

Bronze equestrial statue by Pierre Jules Mène, signed and dated 1863

Pierre Jules Mène (1810 - 1877) was born in Paris. He was the most successful and prolific animalier sculptor of his time, and he is considered an equal to any in ability. His father was a successful metal turner who taught his son how to work with metals and the principles of casting at an early age. Like the artists Barye and Fremiet, Mène spent a great deal of his time at the Jardin des Plantes in Paris drawing.  There he invested many hours sketching the animals from which he would make his sculptures. Though he did receive minimal instruction in art he never attended any of the prestigious art schools and was for the most part a self taught artist.

By 1837 Mène had established the first of his many foundries where he would cast all of his own bronzes throughout his successful career. His first exhibit was at the Salon of 1838 of a Dog and Fox which he cast in bronze. Mène continued to exhibit at the annual Salons, submitting one or more models every year throughout his lifetime.  Mène won several medals at the annual Salon as well as being awarded First Class Medals at the London Exhibitions of 1855 and 1861. His favorite subjects were horses of which he is considered to be the master at portraying.  He created bronze sculpture ranging from animal portraits, to combat groups, to domestic animals, and equestrian groups of both racing and hunting.  It is estimated that he modeled over 150 different subjects during his lifetime. 

In 1861 Mène was awarded the Cross of the Legion d'Honneur in recognition for his contributions to art. His bronzes were cast with the highest quality, detail, and workmanship, literally setting a new standard that all other foundries tried to meet.   After his death in 1877 his foundry was run by his son-in-law Auguste Cain.



Click here to request more information about this item.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
Highlights | Teams | Events | Antiques | Contemporary Art | Home Collection | Textiles & Curtains | Impressions | Press | Contact